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    Click to Expand/Collapse Option Complete text
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionDIONYSUS
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionDEMETER
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionDELIAN APOLLO
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionPYTHIAN APOLLO
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionTO HERMES
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionAPHRODITE
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionAPHRODITE
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionDIONYSUS
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionARES
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionARTEMIS
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionAPHRODITE
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionATHENA
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionHERA
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionDEMETER
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionMOTHER OF THE GODS
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionHERACLES THE LION-HEARTED
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionASCLEPIUS
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionDIOSCURI
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionHERMES
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionPAN
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionHEPHAESTUS
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionAPOLLO
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionPOSEIDON
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionSON OF CRONOS, MOST HIGH
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionHESTIA
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionMUSES AND APOLLO
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionDIONYSUS
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionARTEMIS
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionATHENA
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionHESTIA
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionEARTH THE MOTHER OF ALL
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionHELIOS
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionSELENE
Click to Expand/Collapse OptionDIOSCURI
αὐτὰρ ὃ τοῖσι συνήντετο Φοῖβος Ἀπόλλων:
ἐν πόντῳ δ᾽ ἐπόρουσε δέμας δελφῖνι ἐοικὼς
νηὶ θοῇ καὶ κεῖτο πέλωρ μέγα τε δεινόν τε:
τῶν δ᾽ οὔτις κατὰ θυμὸν ἐπεφράσαθ᾽ ὥστε νοῆσαι
[ἐκβάλλειν δ᾽ ἔθελον δελφῖν᾽: ὁ δὲ νῆα μέλαιναν]
πάντοσ᾽ ἀνασσείσασκε, τίνασσε δὲ νήια δοῦρα. 
Apollo in the shape of dolphin boards the ship and guides the wind
399-403 But Phoebus Apollo
met them: in the open sea he sprang upon their swift ship, like a
dolphin in shape, and lay there, a great and awesome monster, and none
of them gave heed so as to understand; but they sought to cast
the dolphin overboard. But he kept shaking the black ship every way and
make the timbers quiver. 
οἳ δ᾽ ἀκέων ἐνὶ νηὶ καθήατο δειμαίνοντες:
οὐδ᾽ οἵ γ᾽ ὅπλ᾽ ἔλυον κοίλην ἀνὰ νῆα μέλαιναν,
οὐδ᾽ ἔλυον λαῖφος νηὸς κυανοπρώροιο,
ἀλλ᾽ ὡς τὰ πρώτιστα κατεστήσαντο βοεῦσιν,
ὣς ἔπλεον: κραιπνὸς δὲ Νότος κατόπισθεν ἔπειγε
νῆα θοήν: πρῶτον δὲ παρημείβοντο Μάλειαν,
πὰρ δὲ Λακωνίδα γαῖαν ἁλιστέφανον πτολίεθρον
ἷξον καὶ χῶρον τερψιμβρότου Ἠελίοιο,
Ταίναρον, ἔνθα τε μῆλα βαθύτριχα βόσκεται αἰεὶ
Ἠελίοιο ἄνακτος, ἔχει δ᾽ ἐπιτερπέα χῶρον. 
404-413 So they sat silent in their craft for fear, and
did not loose the sheets throughout the black, hollow ship, nor lowered
the sail of their dark-prowed vessel, but as they had set it first of
all with oxhide ropes, so they kept sailing on; for a rushing south wind
hurried on the swift ship from behind. First they passed by Malea, and
then along the Laconian coast they came to Taenarum, sea-garlanded town
and country of Helios who gladdens men, where the thick-fleeced sheep of
the lord Helios feed continually and occupy a glad-some country. 
οἳ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ἔνθ᾽ ἔθελον νῆα σχεῖν ἠδ᾽ ἀποβάντες
φράσσασθαι μέγα θαῦμα καὶ ὀφθαλμοῖσιν ἰδέσθαι,
εἰ μενέει νηὸς γλαφυρῆς δαπέδοισι πέλωρον
ἢ εἰς οἶδμ᾽ ἅλιον πολυΐχθυον αὖτις ὀρούσει.
ἀλλ᾽ οὐ πηδαλίοισιν ἐπείθετο νηῦς εὐεργής,
ἀλλὰ παρὲκ Πελοπόννησον πίειραν ἔχουσα
ἤι᾽ ὁδόν: πνοιῇ δὲ ἄναξ ἑκάεργος Ἀπόλλων
ῥηιδίως ἴθυν᾽: ἣ δὲ πρήσσουσα κέλευθον
Ἀρήνην ἵκανε καὶ Ἀργυφέην ἐρατεινὴν
καὶ Θρύον, Ἀλφειοῖο πόρον, καὶ ἐύκτιτον Αἶπυ
καὶ Πύλον ἠμαθόεντα Πυλοιγενέας τ᾽ ἀνθρώπους.
βῆ δὲ παρὰ Κπουνοὺς καὶ Χαλκίδα καὶ παρὰ Δύμην
ἠδὲ παρ᾽ Ἤλιδα δῖαν, ὅθι κρατέουσιν Ἐπειοί. 
414-426 There
they wished to put their ship to shore, and land and comprehend the
great marvel and see with their eyes whether the monster would remain
upon the deck of the hollow ship, or spring back into the briny deep
where fishes shoal. But the well-built ship would not obey the helm,
but went on its way all along Peloponnesus: and the lord, far-working
Apollo, guided it easily with the breath of the breeze. So the ship ran
on its course and came to Arena and lovely Argyphea and Thryon, the ford
of Alpheus, and well-placed Aepy and sandy Pylos and the men of Pylos;
past Cruni it went and Chalcis and past Dyme and fair Elis, where the
Epei rule. 
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Utviklet av: Jens Braarvig, Asgeir Nesøen, Damir Nedic and Heidi Løken
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